Quick Boner: Grant Morrison and Final Crisis

I can’t get enough of my favorite bald drug abuser!

DC Comics released the cover art to the Final Crisis hardcover, due out in June, and it is gorgeous

Final Crisis Hardcover

The fact that it’ll look handsome on my bookshelf, along with recent news that the collected edition will include the crucial Superman Beyond 3D mini-series, secures that I, ever the salivating fanboy, will be buying Final Crisis all over again. Lolz consumerism!

Also, a number of interviews with Grant Morrison have been going on recently, the best, in my opinion, being published in Wired. Lots of exciting stuff coming up in the future, with Batman & Robin, Seaguy: The Slaves of Mickey Eye, and the possibility of an original graphic novel? Oh baby! Perhaps the most interesting and informative bit from the interview:

Wired.com: Like All-Star Superman with the Man of Steel, Final Crisis pushed apocalypse and deicide to the outer limits of narrative possibility. What are your thoughts on that series? Taken together with The Filth, is it the heaviest series you’ve ever written?

Morrison: Final Crisis was much heavier, much harder to write than The Filth, which at least came with massive doses of surreal black humor to sweeten the bitter pill of the subject matter. On Final Crisis, I spent months immersing myself in the thought processes of an evil, dying God who longed for nothing less than the degradation, destruction and enslavement of all of DC’s superheroes, along with every other living thing in the universe and beyond!

To get into his head, I had to consider people like him in the real world and there were no shortage of candidates. The emissaries of Darkseid seemed to be everywhere, intent on crushing hope, or shattering human self-esteem. I began to hear his voice in every magazine headline accusing some poor young girl of being too fat or too thin. Darkseid was there in the newscasters screaming financial disaster and planet-doom. It was that sick old bastard’s voice terrifying children with his hopeless message of a canceled future, demanding old ladies turn off their electric blankets to help “save the planet,” while turning a blind eye to corporate ecocide.

Up against that, all we had to offer were the wise words of Pico Della Mirandola and Superman singing a song to break your heart. I had to grind America’s superheroes down so hard there was nothing left but diamond in the dark. Everything was falling into a black hole, even the story structure … and fans on message boards were going to war over the thing, screaming “genius” and “gibberish” at one another. It was quite unpleasant to be at the heart of all that but also strangely exhilarating.

I like Final Crisis a lot now that it’s all over. I think it’s the closest I’ve come to creating the type of DC superhero comic I most want to read.

Didn’t think it got much heavier than The Filth, myself, and it’s hard for me to place Final Crisis in that category simply because, at the end of the day, it’s a super hero book where the good guys save the day (kind of?).

But then, maybe seeing our favorite icons of good blasted into oblivion rather than a balding, cat-obsessed chronic masturbator makes it all the more disturbing, if you think about it.

 

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One Response to “Quick Boner: Grant Morrison and Final Crisis”

  1. Anonymous Says:

    omfglolz what a hottie.

    I’m just biding time with my CLOWN of a boyfriend until this shiny-headed, beady-eyed, studmuffin GENIUS finds my phone number.

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